top of page
  • Vicky Carrière

Conservation project: the Loggerhead Shrike

Updated: Nov 14, 2023

With a mission to support research and conservation projects for endangered species, the Makwa Foundation, in partnership with the Omega Park team of caretakers and Wildlife Preservation Canada (WPC) will take participate in a Loggerhead Shrike conservation project.



Once present in Canada, the Loggerhead Shrike is becoming increasingly rare in the territory. Although the causes of the decline of this species are still uncertain, industrialization and the destruction of long-term habitats and nesting grounds probably did not help the cause.


The Eastern Loggerhead Shrike has been designated as endangered by the Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada and is listed under the federal Species at Risk Act. Remember that a species designated as threatened is a species likely to become endangered if no limitations and actions are taken to counter the situation.

Several projects are underway to help conserve this endangered species and the Makwa Foundation is proud to be part of such a project in collaboration with the WPC.


The heart of this conservation operation will be through the breeding of breeding pairs in captivity to then release the birds into the wild and carry out bird monitoring. Thanks to the financial support of the Makwa Foundation, Parc Oméga will welcome on the first year, eight birds, hence four couples, and their reception will take place in the fall of 2023. Note that the birds belong to Environment and Climate Change Canada (Government of Canada ).


“Thanks to the financial support of the Makwa Foundation, Parc Oméga will welcome on the first year, eight birds, hence four couples, and their reception will take place in the fall of 2023.”

The team of expert animal caretakers at Parc Oméga first built the aviary in which the breeding pairs will be welcomed and will be able to live. They will have access to food, water and nest boxes to allow them to nest.





The breeding season in this species takes place in the spring. Males and females will live separately until this time. A litter of four birds per brood can be expected. Once the birds are born, they will be raised by their parents in the Parc Oméga's aviaries.


The fall following the births, the WPC will collect the birds and will be responsible for monitoring measures, including banding, i.e. placing a numbered aluminum band on the leg of the bird. bird. DNA studies through blood sampling and feather sampling will also be carried out before the birds are released into the wild. These interventions will allow the WPC to study population movements in order to better identify the causes of their decline.








5 views0 comments

Comments


Commenting has been turned off.
bottom of page